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department is doing is consistent with u.s. foreign policy. and so, we made progress in increasing personnel exchanges and rebalancing the authorities and in a variety of interactions that the relationship is more intimate and closer than ever before. it's not just with the osd, ostrich adtran office of secretary of defense policy. the defense to dodgy security agency about these agencies take actions, which can have impact on foreign policy and we really rebuilt the capacity of the political military to have the expertise to interact with dod on its own terms. so it is one of the things that has been a real accomplishment. another issue is that the focus on has been a geopolitical changes that have really occurred during the last four years. so that means, for example, tremendous changes in the middle east, the so-called arab spring. that's enormous complicated issues and challenges in libya, egypt, the golf, young men, syria now. dataset implications for security systems policy as well as the major department of defense interacts as well and it designed to make sure they dod and state are
exchanges, and perhaps get out of this ideowhrojical foreign policy so that we can move to sort of the latin left 3.0, the 1.0 was probably fidel in cuba which i think pretty much went out of, you know, it's been superseded. the second wave is probably hugo chavez. but i think the latin left needs to progress towards a third phase. so perhaps if you combine all of these measures the more innovative social measures and perhaps adherence to more environmental climate change concerns, then the bolivarrian revolution can continue and influence the wider region. >> charlie: many people think that there's little resemblance between chavez and bolivar. >> well, yeah, i think that chavez always made these historical illusions to simon bolivar. i think it was a little bit over the top sometimes. but simon bolivar resonates in venezuela. he united the country. throughout much of the 19th century venezuela was divided politically. you had these regional leaders and the 20th century was dominated by military dictators. venezuela harks back to them and that resonates quite a lot symbolically. that's why
and housing and crime and health care and even foreign policy. ask yourself when the last time you saw a stage full of latinos talking about foreign policy. let's talk about foreign policy for a second. antonio is headed, i know, headed to venezuela in a few days and we all know the passing of hugo chavez. there is great conversation and consideration -- concern really about what happened in the region. there's a broader conversation about u.s. policy in latin america, in central america. so there's a lot on the table that we could talk about. give me a sense -- since we're talking about it, why you're going to venezuela? >> i'll be part of the observation process. i'm invited be the national electoral council of vedges. so i'll -- of venezuela. i'll be arriving at polls. although he was demonized in the united states. in latin america there's quite a different perspective on not only hugo chavez but the reform process that has been spreading in south america. they call it the pink revolution where socialists, the president and congresses have been voted in in very participatory democratic ele
, and the u.s. foreign policy is to have some influence in asia. we are shifting from the middle east to asia. so if you want to make all these changes, you are going to have to deal i think with the future president. >> you know north korea and south korea were at war and an armistice was created and the armistice is still in force. so north korea and south korea, that element as north korea looks at south korea and south korea is then viewed as in bed with the united states, in conducting these exercises, so it all becomes even moreen raging to the nark -- to north korea. >> why is no one talking about north korea is developing nuclear weapons at an increasing rate? >> for its own defense. >> they now say they are taking aim at japan and japan will be their first target. why should the u.s. not be there to at least show our strength and power in defense of our ally japan? >> if this is the case, south korea and japan, who are very powerful rich nations a lot stronger than north korea, build their own nuclear deterrents? that is exactly what is going to happen john. this guy he doesn't have
with them his dick cheney wisdom on foreign policy. to be clear, dick cheney didn't show up uninvited and they felt bad and had to let him in, they invited him to talk to them, he is their chosen expert. still. since we reported that story wednesday night after the meeting i have some sort of correction. i've been waiting to feel stupid, right? waiting to hear it was some lefty satire that fooled us, no way did house republicans seek out dick cheney for advice on foreign policy in 2013. can't be. but alas, there has been no correction. that apparently actually happened. and it gets better or worse, better/worse. vice president cheney's next stop after meeting to advise house republicans on foreign policy this week was another speaking gig at the republican national committee spring meeting in los angeles. the official national republican party meeting. this year is aimed specifically at the challenge of, quote, broadening the republican party's appeal with voters. so congressional republicans called in dick cheney for advice on foreign policy matters, and the national republican party
. well, folks, listen to this according to "foreign policy magazine," the united states and north korean officials secretly met in new york city last month. in fact, sources say this meeting was so secret, not even dennis rodman knew about it. [ laughter ] that's how secret. and yesterday on north korean state television, they broadcast a poem entitled "final war with the u.s. imperialists." and the sad thing still got higher ratings than nbc. i couldn't believe that. i couldn't believe that. [ applause ] still got higher ratings. and former vice president dick cheney, he has spoken out about the north korean situation. he said when it comes to north korea, we are in deep doo doo. that was his exact quote. deep doo doo. so apparently, all those years of briefing president bush have taken their toll, you know? [ laughter ] have some great -- yeah. yeah. well, the latest is -- the latest is that north korea officials are planning a a cyberattack on the u.s. in an effort to bring our economy to a halt. nice try, guys. you're five years too late, okay? nice try. there you go. gotcha on that
even deeper into the fabric of american foreign policy. but i need to do that i could not just preach to the usual choir. that we had to reach out, not only to men in solidarity and recruitment, but to religious communities, to every partner we could find. we had to make the case to the whole world that creating opportunities for women and girls advances security and prosperity for everyone. so we relied on the empirical research that shows that when women participate in the economy, everyone benefits. when women participate in peacemaking and peacekeeping, we are all safer and more secure. and when women participate in the politics of their nation, they can make a difference. but as strong a case as we have made, to many otherwise thoughtful people continue to see the fortunes of women and girls as somehow separate from society at large. they nod, they smile, and then they relegate these issues, once again, to the sidelines. i have seen it over and over again. i have been kidded about it. i have been ribbed, i have been challenged in board rooms and official offices across the world.
refugees spilling over its borders. [speaking in foreign language] >> reporter: foreign policy chief said that we maintain the issue should be handled and resolved peacefully through dialogue and consultation, china agreed to work with the u.s. kerry believes china will put essure to have north korea change its ways. >> no question in my mind that china is very serious, very serious about denuclearizing. today they made an unprecedented joint statement. they tone usually do that. >> reporter: north korea tuesday -- they don't usually do that. >> reporter: north korea said reportedly they will not back down. the leader has grown more defiant in recent weeks. the north says it has two missiles ready to fire. >> and there is no evidence north korea has missiles that could reach the u.s. mainland but the u.s. has missile defense system in place to protect american military bases in the region. >>> the u.s. transportation safety board is sending investigators to help figure out what caused a plane to crash into the ocean. the new lineair boeing 737 missed the runway yesterday as it tried to
the policies of the bush administration in the american foreign policy in retreat. in the ultimate obama survival guide how to survive, thrive and prosper, executive vice chairman of the conservative caucus presents his thoughts on the obama administration. a history of chicago and the influence it had on the economy and the arts in the third post, when chicago built the american dream. in beyond more, rear imagining american influence in a new lease, pull the prize-winning reporter david rose presents his thoughts on american foreign policy decisions in the middle east. look for these titles in bookstores this coming week and watch for authors in the near future on booktv and on booktv.org. >> you are watching booktv and we are live for the 2013 annapolis book festival, an event in its eleventh year at the key school in maryland. here's our lineup for the day. in a minute we will have a panel on maryland since 1812 and then look at the future of urban development with peter and alan karenall. jake tamper and john noggel will talk about the war in afghanistan and whether w
, george bundy, that he wants on all foreign policy issues a range of opinions. not one opinion, not two, but a long continuum. and he wants fromm as the dove. so kennedy gets every single position on every issue that fromm creates. then, of course, we know 50 years ago, october 1962, the cuban missile crisis. and the world came very close to being blown up. well, after, about ten days after kennedy called fromm. we have the call listed at the kennedy library. we, of course, don't have the content. though david reeseman pretty much told me the content. how do you avoid a mess like this again? all right. in june of '63, kennedy gives his famous american university speech. his most important foreign policy speech. and what does he say? essentially, i don't like the russians, you don't like the russians, but we're going to get blown up if we don't deal with the russians seriously. and we have to do it in a sequential way, pushing for a disarmament position, having them push and so forth. that's fromm's article. in fact, some of the exact words and sentences in the magazine article are in th
're doing overseas in our foreign policy. where do you stand? >> and the same thing that happened after 9/11 as we continued operations in iraq and afghanistan as well. i completely agree with you. this is not about politicizing the issue. this is about humanizing it. this is about making people remember what we're talking about here. we're talking about someone who walked into a school on december 14th, with an assault rifle and started doing tap shots on children, this is what we're talking about. the fact is that the further we are removed from sandy hook, the more challenging it is for people to remember that. if we had a bill that was ready to go on december 15th, this would be a very different conversation. the problem is that awe we're moving further away from what happened in connecticut, we have to continually remind people, this is what's at stake. this is what we're talking about. and so we're not talking about this issue of and we see how the bills continue to adapt and evolve. we're not even talking about taking away certain weapons or high-capacity magazines. we're literally
is consistent with u.s. foreign policy. and so we made progress in increasing personnel exchanges in rebalancing the authority, and in a variety of different interactions. the relationship is more intimate and closer than ever before, and it's not just with the office of secretary of defense policy. what my bureau deals with all the different organizations wind dod, the defense cooperation agency. the defense technology agency and all these agencies take actions which can have impact on u.s. foreign policy, and we rebuilt the capacity of the political military affairs bureau to enter act with dod on its own terms. so at it one of the things that is a real accomplishment. another issue that we have had to focus on has been the geopolitical changes that have really occurred during the last four years. so that means, for example, we have had tremendous changes in the middle east. so-called arab spring. and that has led to enormously complicated issues, from challenges in libya, egypt, the gulf, yemen, syria, and so -- that has had implications for our security systems policy, as well as the way tha
they want is a smart, efficient foreign policy. i do not think we've had a foreign policy that made a hell of a lot of sense, truthfully, going back to george bush. i'm not being critical of the president, but, general dempsey, i talked to john finish. [inaudible] recently who is inspector general for reconstruction, i spoke to stuart bowen two days ago, and yet we continue to spend money in those countries. today i had general gardener, jake gardener, was in my office for an hour and a half. he is of the firm belief in the next year to three years there will be a civil war if iraq, and i don't know -- and i hope, mr. secretary, that you and general kevin si, for goodness sakes, how can america -- excuse me -- continue to police the world, keep all these bases overseas open? and then i hear you in your testimony and general dempsey, and i agree with you. we are in a financial collapse. and i saw an army corporal on tuesday of this week from my district. he's lost a leg, three fingers and brain injury. he's got a wife and four children. he lives in north carolina. and i don't know, somebody
, efficient foreign policy. i don't think we have had a foreign policy that's made a helluva lot of sense going back to george bush. not being critical of the president, but general dempsey, i taught to the inspector general for reconstruction two days ago. and yet we continue to spend money in those countries. today, i had jake gardner in my office for an hour-and-a-half. he is of the firm belief that the next year to three years, there will be a civil war in iraq. secretary, that you and general dempsey, how can america continue to police the world, keep all of these bases overseas open, and that i hear you in your testimony, and i agree, we are in a financial collapse. i saw an army corporal on tuesday of this week for my district who has lost a leg, three fingers, and brain injury. he has a wife and four children. he lives in north carolina and i don't know -- somebody has to wake up this country. yes, we have to have a strong military. strong buthave a that, but they deserve better than what they get from an administration and congress that wants to send abroad a world and change the
appointed him her foreign-policy adviser. she was a great leader of the conservative party. people are entitled to ask, was she actually a conservative? does not normally mean something who is weighted and tradition, costs just -- cautious of change? the most radical prime minister of the last few generations. there is never the less the consistency between these two. what you erect masts -- what she had recognized was that britain had gone the wrong way, taken the wrong path for 20 or 30 years and needed change. that is what what made her article. many honorable members know that the hero says,re if you want things to stay the same, things will have to change. that very much was her belief. , am conscious of the fact having spent a lot of my time in the foreign office, the diplomats in the foreign office were not her favorite department. i went to see her when i was defense secretary some years later after she had retired. she said to me, the ministry of defense, your problem have no allies. the foreign office, they are not wet. they are drenched. [laughter] she had a remarkable c
this is furthering our long-term foreign policy and national security goals. and you look at what has happened in pakistan. disapproval of u.s. leadership under obama, 92%s of country disapproves of the president, 4% approves. and most outside analysis that's due in large part because of the use of drone strikes inside the country. >> i think it's important for people to understand what exactly that is and what that means. literally you have these aerial drones which are completely out of any type of visual view. and a person whether he's sleeping there or any type of confinement. a missile that can take out an entire area. the danger that i have and again this also goes back to the challenge of short-term accomplishment versus long-term challenge that comes in and the argument of winning hearts and minds. the argument of yens, all the arguments that come into this thing. the biggest challenge we have is dovetailing on this earlier point. how exactly do we justify this? and how do we curtail its use? look what happened after the use of the first atomic bomb where then the big question became h
with the american people want. what they want to say smaller efficient foreign policy. i don't think we've had a foreign policy that made a lot of sense truthfully going back to george bush. not being critical of the president, the general dempsey, high-tech to the inspector general of reconstruction. i spoke to stuart bowen and we continue to spend money. today i had general jay garner in my office for an hour and a half. he is at the firm belief in the next year to three years there will be a civil war in iraq and i hope mr. secretary, do you have general dempsey for goodness sakes continue to police and keep all these faces overseas open. we are in a financial collapse. also an army corporal from my district has lost a leg, three fingers and brain injury. he's got a wife and four children. he lives in north carolina. somebody has got to wake up this country. yes we've got to have a strong military. we've got to have a strong defense, but they deserve better than what they get from it is tradition in congress that wants to send them around the world can change the culture of countries that c
? >> these are foreign-policy advisers to commanders in dod. in 2007, there was only basically the senior combatant commands and the joint chiefs, naval chiefs of operations, marine commandant. for the first time, we've added a foreign-policy adviser to the joint chiefs of staff. ever now serving not just a cms command, so it's not just the ambassador for his final tour, but we are having more mid-level officers serving with two three-star commands and getting that experience and to withdraw from afghanistan, were not going to have as much as an opportunity for foreign service is to serve side-by-side in the military. it will be a key element of preserving the experience of working side-by-side. our goal is to have political counselors and about others who have experience working side-by-side with military commanders. one of the things we found when i came into this job was that it wasn't considered necessarily a desirable job and we put a lot of effort into making sure those who do good work get promoted. if you get promoted, it becomes more desirable. we had more dates are foreign-policy adviser
-explanatory, but i think the problem's a lot worse than people imagine. there is surrender which is a foreign policy chapter, and it's not a neo-con sort of argument, it's more a reflection of how we believe our place in the world and what it is. and finally, it's death which is inevitable for most of us and is about abortion for the most part. >> so this book is being published now in march. how long did you have to put the book together, and were you thinking of obama's second term, or what was the timeline for this title? >> with well, i didn't think mitt romney would win. i wrote that. but i pulled it together rather quickly. i had been thinking about it, but the book is, it's not a huge book because how much can you read about the four horsemen really. but it is a slim book, but it took about a month to write. >> currently we're in the budget situation, what are your thoughts on that? >> well, i think there's an ideological divide in washington mow that's going to be hard to come to any sort of consensus or agreement on what to do. and, you know, we're in bad shape in that sense. i like the pau
of talking to him in terms of foreign policy, you saw that on north korea, they probably think dick cheney is a decent person to listen to. and i also think, brooke, this is a little bit about dick cheney getting back in the mix, trying to protect his legacy, his reputation. he's been more outspoken as you know than the former president. very critical of president obama. thing he likes that. i think he likes that role. >> so what is this new role he seems to be carving out for himself? >> critic, vocal critic and with a certain group of people. that would be the republican base. i think dick cheney has a certain amount of credibility, and he's a person out there rallying the base. if you're looking for independent voters, if you're looking for moderates, dick cheney is never going to be your person, but if you're trying to say to the base, we haven't forgotten you particularly on strong defense issues, i think -- think dick cheney is your man. but as you know on an issue, for example, like same-sex marriage, dick cheney who has a gay daughter has come out and said, you know, we ought to le
to share with them dick cheney wisdom on foreign policy. former vice president reportedly told republicans at the meeting we are in, quote, deep doodoo when it comes to north korea. how does dick cheney know about this situation? he bases that assessment on his own experience dealing with former iraqi dictator, saddam hussein. his record of dealing with saddam hussein was things like him telling us he had a nuclear weapons program he didn't have, while at the same time ignoring the actual nuclear weapons program that north korea really did have. north korea became a nuclear weapons state on the bush administration's watch while they were preoccupied starting a war for fun in iraq. that's who the congressional republicans are inviting to give advice on dealing with dictators, and the depth of our doo doo. that's who they're going to for advice. he didn't show up uninvited and they felt bad and let him in, they invited him to talk to them. he is their chosen expert. heaven help us. [ female announcer ] when a woman wears a pad she can't always move the way she wants. now you can. with stayfr
will not be able to act effectively before this plays out. >> neil: i know you're the foreign policy expert but i nowhere countries are on a map so i'm equally qualified to talk about this. i think that china doesn't know what the hell to do with this guy and he is a nut out of control. >> well, look, number one, we don't really know who is in charge in north korea, and i'm just amazed when watch the director of national intelligence testify as he has in the past couple of days that this is somehow a reflection of an effort internally to show that kim jong-un is in control. we don't know whether he is in control, the generals are in control, or it's some combination in between. i think you're right. china is schizophrenic about what to do with north korea. the older generation, still looks at north korea as a necessary buffer state to keep the united states away from the border with china. the younger generation, however, seeing this nuclear menace on their border, seeing what an ugly piece of baggage that regime is, is much more amenable to talking about what i think the real solution is, which
generals he is tough enough to lead north korea so may be domestic or foreign policy reasons. i do think it's important for the united states to be very firm. i think the obama administration has been very firm and very tough, and yet measured, because no one wants to provoke someone like this, who doesn't have a track record in anywhere billion politics. -- in international politics. >> i guess we don't know if we can trust him. >> that's exactly right. the only -- no american official has met him. he doesn't have a track record. and so you do need to be very firm and the administration's south korea and japan have put up a unite front. it wouldn't be right to make him promises of negotiations as the russians did today, without some tough language behind that. so i think, shep, that china and russia bear a lot of responsibility now to be more aggressive and tougher with the north koreans behind the scenes to get them to stop these outrageous and incendiary attacks. the verbal attacks they've made. and to stop them before they do something that they'll regret later. russia and china need to
foreign policy in our countries, which a lot of americans are very ignorant about. cenk: i saw a tweet before i came on the air of someone saying the iraqis have been living with these kind of i.e.d.'s for 10 years because of the war we started when they didn't attack us on 9/11 at all. it happens here once, we all totally justifiably freak out it could have been us, could have been our kids, only it was the iraqis, it was their kids based on a war we started and never be should have. cenk: security, and how do you protect against these threats think of iraqar kabul any city with a high level of violence, you have the entire government set up to prevent bombs from getting through and they still can't do it. you have 100,000 iraqis and americans searching every car and they still get through. there is no way to protect against this stuff on a 100% basis. the fact that this happens with irregularity with other things blowing up around the world, we should be thankful for it. one in 20 million is not bad. cenk: on a relative scale. there is one mythical thing that if it turns out it was a
overseas. in terms of our foreign policy. if we need to keep doing that and we have to keep doing it. we have to tell the american people how bloody and how long this war is going to be. this has nothing to do with gender equality or elections. it has to do with waging war against people believe to be interfering with their land and their faith. lou: thank you both for being with us. >> thank you, sir. lou: up next, the markets recover after yesterday's massive sell-off. we will show you why here next. ♪ @ ♪ lou: stocks recovered from the biggest 1-day sell-off of this year on encouraging news on housing. joining us now, a senior u.s. economist for deutsche bank securities. this is a pretty impressive performance today. is it convincing enough hat we are going to see more strength on the days ahead? >> it certainly has been impressive as a performance. i think a lot of the movement we saw today was just to recover from the massive sell-off yesterday when the news of the tragedy in boston struck. stocks went into a sharp nosedive. the news that it was a relatively limited event
's not rocket science. it's just common sense. >>> let's bring in mike, staff writer and celeste, foreign policy analyst from the department of labor's occupational safety and health administration. great to have you both here. when you heard about this, mike and started looking through the osha records, i saw it from your reporting, were you surprised it had been so long since osha inspected the plant? >> no. literally the plant had not been inspected in my lifetime, literally not since 1985. there's not enough osha inspector inspectors for the country. there are so few in texas, it would take 98 years for them to inspect every place once. it didn't surprise me. typically there's only an inspector when a worker calls up and complains and typically only in a union workplace. >> it's a complaint and people come out and not like doors on hazardous work sites. >> occasionally, not that often. >> what is the standard. you would think a fertiliz fertilizer -- about 20 employees in this west fertilizer warehouse where this happened. what is this standard that would prompt a heightened level of scrutin
, analyst at your age group. we also have been as a year, senior fellow at the foreign policy research institute. and a spokesperson for free venezuela. thanks to both of you. what do you make of the events you are seeing? is this a surprise? >> i am actually pleased to see that they are actually standing for their rights. is a surprised by how close the election laws. even there were surpris that they claim that it was only one-half percent victory over the opposition. it is an indication to those that the election was stolen. even that they could not stealing more somehow. closer run then they realized. melissa: what do you make of what is going on down there right now? what does it indicate to you about where the people's real feelings are and what might happen? >> i think the election was much closer than we and most observers were expecting. i think, you know, it will be difficult for the opposition to really, you know, overturned. he looks likely to be able to remain as the president, but i think he enters his term as -- in a really weak position with questionable legitimacy. mel
mean asking dick cheney for advice on foreign policy is like asking dick cheney for advice on gun safety. his credibility is gone. he was the architect of the worst foreign policy disaster of our generation. asking him about the future on foreign policy especially much less anything else, i mean, this guy in my opinion, frankly, i think dick cheney -- i'm one american who thinks dick cheney is actually a bad person. >> oh. so patricia, on the other hand, you can't really alienate your base either, and the republicans know that. they have to hang on to their base as well as attract new people to the matter. dick cheney is still much admired among core republicans, right? >> the reason dick cheney is the right person for them to hear prosecute is that republicans still respect dick cheney. you know, the reason that he is the wrong person to hear from in terms of policy going forward is that he is a 72-year-old white man. they are doing just fine with 72-year-old white men among the republican party, and they're losing national elections. it feels right now about a party that is all
's investment in foreign-policy is national security insurance. there is nothing foreign about foreign policy anymore. smartcan make the small,. w vestments upfront and avoid more costly conflicts and greater burdens down the road. , we'vepast few months seen developments underscore the state -- stakes for having a strong and -- strong american presence in the world. that was a positive step toward stability in the volatile region of the world where we need partnerships. the committee is more than immersed in suyyruiaia. we have treated millions to humanitarian relief -- we have provided millions to humanitarian relief. i expect we will talk about syria somewhat today. having returned from beijing and north koreathe issue took center stage, we are reminded once again that america is the guardian of global security. we should be proud of that. one not turn our back on keys nor will we hesitate what we need to do to defend our allies. if budget is an analyst patient of our values and priorities -- this budget is an illustration of our values and priorities. i have a record of wanting to do defi
rating there, sits at 47%. on foreign policy, he's at 46%. that's the lowest approval number on that issue that we've ever recorded for him and the president's 47% positive personal rating is at a one-year low. on the sequester, most people say it hasn't impacted them at all. just 16% say the sequester cuts have had at least quite a bit of impact on their own pocketbooks. but there is fear out there, when asked if sequester would harm the economy as a whole, 47% believe that it will. we tested the country's feelings on some 2016ers and it turns out there's hillary clinton and then there's everybody else. clinton has the highest personal rating at 56%. marco rubio and rand paul both have net positive ratings, but the new york city mayor, michael bloomberg, slight net negative. i guess being in the face of big gulp doesn't help. and as the networks of nbc news put a special focus on immigration nation today, for the first time in the poll, a majority of the public agrees with the statement that immigration strengthens the nation. 54% believe immigration does strengthen this cou
some foreign policy wonks. it seem to dismiss the provocations of north korea. they say we've seen this before. kim jong-un isn't crazy. north korea is still a rational actor. i'm wondering, are you confident we're doing everything we can in the event that he actually does act on some of these threats? >> well, i think secretary kerry's actions that he rushed and that he is in south korea, his next stop as he is in china. we need china not to be missing in action in this. because china when you look at north korea, the closest allies are china and russia. i would say to you, s.e., i'm concerned. i'm concerned that north korea's reckless talk will lead to reckless action. >> have we heard anything from china? have you heard anything from china that leads to you believe that they may be a little mifed and coming around to our side of this? >> i have. then a few days ago, they basically brushed back north korea saying hold on a second. i share one of your points here. we got to remember, north korea is no joke. they have the fourth largest army in the world. they have 9 million people
. their message for the president looks that foreign-policy in the middle east. they are third prize winners in this year's student cam competition. >> the problem with war is that you know when it starts but you don't know when it finishes up. it's completely unpredictable. we don't know what the other side is going to do. ♪ >> dear mr. president, iran is capable of developing nuclear weapons and threatening israel. my family is from israel. >> what unites everyone in the political system in israel is a deep concern about iran's nuclear program and a strong assumption by international bodies in the united states that iran is pursuing a nuclear weapons program. but the preference among me israeli elite is that international community led by the united states, and others, will do with this problem as an international problem. >> this will not only affect the student and her family but also have worldwide repercussions. for the saudi's to get a nuclear weapon if iran does. then we could have a nuclear arms race in the middle east. the turks, egyptians, everybody is going to want a bomb. was
farragut middle school in knoxville, tennessee. their message for the president looks at foreign-policy in the middle east. they are third prize winners in this year's student cam competition. >> the problem with war is that you know when it starts but you don't know when it finishes up. it's completely unpredictable. we don't know what the other side is going to do. >> dear mr. president, iran is capable of developing nuclear weapons and threatening israel. my family is from israel. >> what unites everyone in the political system in israel is a deep concern about iran's nuclear program and a strong assumption by international bodies in the united states that iran is pursuing a nuclear weapons program. but the preference among the israeli elite is that international communities led by the united states and others will view with this problem as an international problem. >> this will not only affect the student and her family but also have worldwide repercussions. >> it would be simple for the saudi's to get a nuclear weapon if iran does. then we could have a nuclear arms race in the midd
of charges that becomes a big foreign policy problem. that's one of the reasons why the state department was so opposed to the waterboarding under colin powell. >> exactly. to have it labeled -- so then you get into the territory of were crimes committed? and what kind of future implications there are for that. >> briefly, before i let you go. we do want to talk about it in more detail, the book. the appreciate now to move the program from the cia back to where many say it afc belonged in the military where there could be more oversight. what you've uncovered is the extent of secret relationships with pakistan, things that have never been reported, never been revealed, i guess, to other than the intel gens community? >> i think when you look at the history of the secret war since 9/11, there's so much that's gone on in the shadows that we have not known about and not certainly told to the public or told to congress. as you said, pressure is building to become more transparent. president obama set in the state of the union there would be more transparency, and we'll see what happens. >> t
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